Ten (10) Tips for Passing the Licensure Exam for Teachers (LET)

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After reviewing for the Licensure Exam for Teachers and passing it, way back during my time, I decided to share my ten LET passing tips here on my blog. These tips are essentially helpful if you decide not to enroll in a review center and just review on your own to get a license for teaching.

Preparation
# 1 Know your weak and strong subjects
Allot a few hours each day or each week to review the lessons for classes you did well when you were still in college. Enjoy this review time so you can easily remember what you are re-learning.
Allot more time, however, on classes you were weak in. Well, at least if you are weak in mathematics for example, make sure you don’t miss reviewing the concepts that will be tested in the General Math part of the licensure exam.
It will be easy to find out your areas of weakness. Check the grades in your transcript or assess yourself which among the classes you took you don’t remember much about.
See pointers to review based on PRC’s table of specification (TOS). Also read the coverage of the exam with schedule.

Preparation2

# 2 Understand the major theories, concepts and techniques in Professional Education subjects.
Understanding the theories and concepts by heart will allow you to answer questions that are written to confuse you. There are times that you have to choose which among the situations on the choices will be logical based on theories or concepts mentioned or implied in the question.
I didn’t have any teaching experience when I took the exam so I really based a lot of my answers on what I remembered from my college years.

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# 3 Strive hard to improve your analytical skills on answering questions.
After you reviewed the theories and concepts, you should test your understanding by differentiating and explaining these in your own words. While reviewing, rephrase ideas and think of actual applications.
For example, in methods of teaching, allow yourself to compare method 1 with method 2, then ask yourself why method 1 is preferred than the other on certain situations.

Ask yourself questions like:

  • “Why are you doing _________?”
  • “Why is it similar to ______________?”
  • “What if you will not _________, what will happen?”
  • “Why the result is different?”
  • “How can I apply this?”
  • “Have I experienced this myself?”
  • “What other examples can I think of?”
  • “In other words, this is about ____________.”
  • Just keep asking yourself regarding whatever you’ve just read on your review. Analyze and answer in your own words. If there are questions at the end of each chapter of your book, answer those questions.
    Enjoy this process so you will remember.

#4 Review General Education subjects.
Remember that you have to pass all three sets of tests including General Education (for Secondary Education) and two sets of the tests (for Elementary Education).
Don’t assume that General Education is easy since you took the Gen Ed. classes when you were in Elementary or High School. Remember that a lot of years had passed. So refresh your memory especially on common mathematical equations (e.g. Fractions, Volumes, Areas, Percentages, Ages, Distance and Time computations) and major science concepts (e.g. Matter, Gravity, Mass, Energy, Friction). You’ll never know what will show up in your test.
Solve problems listed on your review materials or old books.
# 5 Prepare everything you need for the exam.
Make sure you have read the test guidelines, which included the things you need to bring for the exam.
Also check if the calculator you plan to bring for the exam is in PRC’s list of allowed calculators . If not, buy or borrow a calculator that has a model listed there (I bought mine). If you don’t want to buy a new one, make sure you have a non-programmable calculator. But don’t take my word on this because I wasn’t sure if other proctors had allowed calculators not on the list. Although my friend said she didn’t even check the list and just grabbed a basic calculator on the exam day. Proctors check each calculator before the exam starts.

sleep well night before
# 6 Get enough sleep before the exam.
Make sure you don’t feel drowsy while taking the exam so you have enough time to answer all the test questions. You don’t want to fail because you didn’t have enough sleep the night before.

no erasures
# 7 Avoid erasures, OR MAKE THE ERASURE CLEAN AT LEAST. And Of Course, Shade it Properly!
In Centro Escolar University (CEU), where I attended college from 2003 to 2007, we used Scantron papers for our prelim, mid-term, and final exams. So, I’m used to answering tests by shading boxes.
I knew how erasures could make a bad score. So before you shade it, make sure you are shading the right answer, or at least it is your final answer. If you need to erase it, make sure it is clean. But I still don’t think it is a good idea.
So, before the exam day, try the eraser you plan to bring. On a white paper, or a semi-cardboard white paper, write something on it with the pencil you plan to bring and erase this writing with this eraser. If the eraser erases cleanly your writing, then you are good.
I also make sure when I shade the box of my answer, I don’t shade it beyond the box (huwag lumampas ang shading). Don’t shade it heavily too (Baka masira mo ung papel).

skip
# 8 Skip questions you aren’t sure and go back to them later on.
There are some questions that no matter how well you prepared for the exam, you will have no idea what the answer is or it will take you a lot of time to answer it. If you come across to questions like these skip them first. Answer questions that you know as much as you can then go back to the questions you skipped.
If you still can’t figure out the right answer the second time you look at the skipped question, make an educated guess. Eliminate options that are obvious detractors and you will end up with two best possible answers.
Make a very very educated guess at this point when you really can’t figure the right one out. Or follow your instinct (See Tip #10).
# 9 Follow instructions.
Listen to what the proctor is telling you during the exam. If you are confused, ask the proctor directly not your seatmate.

# 10 Bring with you your Common Sense.
Most of the time, you haven’t reviewed whatever appears on the real exam. What will help you answer the exam are your basic understanding of the topics and your analytical skill. Don’t over do it though because you might miss the right answer.

How to Focus More On Studying : In six steps

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How to Focus on Studying: Introduction

We’ve all been there: Sitting at a desk or table studying intently, and then…Wham! Thoughts from all over the place invade our brains and we get distracted. If it’s not our thoughts, it’s our roommates. Or neighbors. Or kids.

These study intruders take over, causing us to lose focus. And focus, friends, is what you need to be able to study for any of the big tests.

So how do you focus?

These six steps will show you how to regain focus if you get distracted, and how to set yourself up for focus success before your study session ever begins.

1.Get Rid of Obvious Distractions

It’s not smart to study with your cell phone on, even if it’s set to vibrate. As soon as you get a text, you’re going to look. You’re human! You can’t focus on studying if you’re chatting with someone else, too. So the cell phone is off limits.

Turn off the home phone, too, along with the computer (unless you’re prepping on it) and any music with vocals. Study music should be lyric-free! Post a sign on your door for people to stay away. If you have kids, find a babysitter for an hour. If you have roommates, head out of the house to the least popular spot in the library. For that one study session, make yourself inaccessible to people and other external study distractions, so you don’t lose focus when someone wants to chat.

2. Anticipate Your Physical Needs

If you’re studying intently, you’re going to get thirsty. Grab a beverage before you open the book. You may even need a power snack while you’re working, so grab some brain food, too. Use the bathroom, put on comfortable clothes (but not cozy), set the air/heat to best suit you. If you anticipate your physical needs before you start studying, you’ll be less likely to need to get out of your seat and lose the focus you worked hard to gain.

3. Choose an Appropriate Time

If you’re a morning person, choose the a.m. for your study session; if you’re a night owl, choose the evening. You know yourself better than anyone else, so choose the time when you’re at the height of your brain power and the least tired. It’ll be much more difficult to focus if you’re battling fatigue, too.

4. Answer Your Internal Questions

Sometimes the distractions aren’t coming from the external – they’re invading from within! We’ve all sat down to study and had worries and other internal distractions invade our brains. “When is she going to call me? When am I going to get a raise?”

It seems silly, but if you answer your own internal questions, you’ll focus your mind back where you want it to go. If necessary, write the the worry down, solve it in a simplistic manner and move on.

5. Get Physical

Some people are just antsy. They need to be doing something, and their bodies don’t make the connection that they are doing something during studying. Sound familiar? If you’re one of these kinesthetic learners, get out a few things to anticipate an “ants in your pants” issue: a pen, a rubber band, and a ball.

Pen: Underline words when you read. Cross off incorrect answers when you’re taking a practice test. Moving just your hand may be enough to shake off the jitters. If it’s not…
Rubber band. Stretch it. Wrap it around your pen. Play with the rubber band while you’re answering questions. Still feeling jumpy?
Ball. Read a question sitting down, and then stand and bounce the ball against the floor as you think of an answer. Still can’t focus?
Jump. Read a question sitting down, then stand and do ten jumping jacks. Sit back down and answer the question.

 

get serious

6. Get Rid of the Negativity

It’s impossible to focus on studying if you have all sorts of negative ideas about studying. If you’re one of those people who say, “I hate studying!” or “I’m too upset/tired/sick/whatever to study, then you must learn how to flip those negative statements into positive ones, so you don’t automatically shut down when you open up your notes. It’s amazing how quickly studying can become an awful burden with just a poor frame of mind. Here are the top three negative statements people make about studying, and a quick, easy way to fix each one of them.

Tips:

Don’t be afraid to ask for a little quiet if you’re studying in a public place. Here are four polite ways to get people to pipe down when you’re trying to study.
Use a good pen like the Pilot Dr. Grip. Sometimes a leaky or uncomfortable pen can undermine your study session.
Wear comfortable, not cozy clothes. Your mind will associate relaxing with sweatpants or pj’s. Choose something you’d wear to school or a movie.
Tell yourself something positive in case you get distracted despite following the steps above: “I know I lost focus, but I’m going to try again and make sure I’m successful this time.” Positive encouragement goes a long way even if it’s coming from you.
Drink your favorite beverage while studying as a reward for your ability to stay focused. Keep it non-alcoholic!
What You Need:

  • A good pen
  • A prep book
  • Scrap paper
  • Lyric-free music
  • Your favorite beverage
  • Brain Food
  • A rubber band
  • A tennis ball
  • A quiet place to study


Conquer Time Management Once and For All 

manage your time

 

Time management is key to working efficiently. If you use the following steps, they’ll help get you feel less stressed and become more productive.

  • Figure out where your time goes.

Print two copies of the “Where Do I Spend My Time” spreadsheet pdf at the bottom of this page. One chart is for your typical weekly routine right now. The other is for your new, organized routine. Fill out the first chart with your current weekly routine, and fill out the second chart with your absolute imperatives (work and sleep.)

  • Reconsider the time drains.

Take a look at your chart and see what your time drains are – the useless portions of the day that are unimportant to you where you’re spinning your wheels and accomplishing next to nothing. Did you find that you spend three hours watching TV at night? Or messing with Facebook or Twitter? Are you running up to the store three days a week because you haven’t taken the time to make a list? That’s a time drain!

On your new chart, reevaluate your time drains. Where could you cut back to free some hours for other, more important things? You’ll gain more hours than you even realize if you cut out just a few of the time drains.

  • Schedule productivity.

After you’ve freed up some time by banishing the time drains, mark some “productivity” time into your schedule. Physically set an appointment with yourself every day to manage your life, and things won’t pile up all at once. If you gain an extra hour in the evening by cutting back your Facebook time, then spend it catching up with what you’ve been leaving out – plan some meals at home, manage your bills, reorganize the closet, fix the leaky faucet, go through the mail, make a grocery list.

On your new chart, schedule some productivity time right now.

  • Schedule leisure.

It might sound silly to plan free time, but if you don’t do it, you’ll take it anyway, and it typically cuts into the productivity time. So plan some fun, relaxing things to do in your week. Make them a priority by getting rid of time drains to do it. You’ll be surprised how truly relaxing it feels to have scheduled leisure time because there’s no guilt; you’ve taken care of everything else you needed to do, so you’ve earned it!

On your new chart, schedule some leisure time right now.

  • Plan for setbacks.

You’ll never be able to stop that railroad crossing from pushing you off schedule. Your kids will inevitably throw a temper tantrum as you’re trying to get them off to school. But if you plan for the occasional disastrous day, it’s easy to recover.

 

Source

Exams Study Tips : Boosts your Memory

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Your memory plays an important part in preparing for exams. The tips and ideas in this section will help you to remember things, but people learn things in different ways so try some of them and see which ones work best for you. For example, some students like to see information written down, some prefer to listen to information and others learn better while they are walking or moving around.

Try out these different ideas. Which ones help you remember best?

  • Use pictures and visuals to help you remember things. For example, to learn vocabulary, use a picture dictionary.
  • Make diagrams and mind maps. For example, make mind maps for different topics of vocabulary or use tables to record word families.

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  • Write notes and then use highlighters and coloured pens to focus on important things. For example, use different colours to highlight pronunciation or different grammatical words.
  • Look at your diagrams, mind maps or highlighted notes again a few hours later or the next day. The more often you look at your notes, the more you will remember.
  • Write things down.

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  • Stick pieces of paper around your room with notes and look at them regularly.
  • Use your mobile phone or an online voice recorder (there are lots of free voice recorders online) to record your voice. Record yourself reading your notes and then listen to the recordings.

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  • Study with a friend. Explain things to each other and ask each other some questions. If you like listening to information, this will help you remember.
  • Read out loud (or record) just the main points you have underlined or highlighted.

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  • Listen to your notes regularly. The more you listen, the more you will remember.
  • Connect new information to things you already know. For example, when you learn a new meaning of a word, think about the meaning you already know. Is there a connection?

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  • Read your notes aloud while you are sitting or walking  around.
  • Go for a walk with a friend and test each other while you are walking.

source: British Council