How to Build a Student’s Fluency in Reading

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Fluency in reading is distinct and different from comprehension and involves the speed, accuracy and tonality of a reader when they read aloud. Although fluency is distinct from comprehension, the two are interrelated. Often, readers with high levels of reading comprehension are also very fluent readers, and the inverse is also true. Low comprehension is often associated with low fluency. Difficulty occurs when students are trying to comprehend at the same time they’re reading aloud.

Modeling
One of the best ways to increase fluency is to model it for students. When a teacher reads books aloud with the right amount of pacing, expressiveness and pitch, students learn by their example. The best way to model fluency is to choose a text that is age- and reading level-appropriate and have students read along silently as you read it aloud. If the book is suspenseful, add pauses to heighten the suspense and then ask students why they think that you paused or raised your voice during certain sections. This makes the reading more engaging and interactive, and students will learn how to vary the tone and pitch as they read.
Reading Aloud
Having students practice reading aloud is a great way to help them become more fluent readers. This can be done either in whole or small groups. With a whole group, read the text aloud first and then have students echo read and repeat lines or sentences together aloud, mimicking how you read it. With smaller groups, you can have students echo read one at a time and take turns with different pieces of the text.
Reading Scripts
Students of all age groups enjoy reading plays. They get to “act” using their voice alone. Because script reading involves conveying emotion without actually physically acting out a scene from a play, students are forced to vary the pitch, pacing and tone of their voices to convey meaning. Reading plays helps students with fluency because the effectiveness of their portrayal of certain characters depends on the fluency of their reading.
Reading Comprehension
The faster and more advanced that a student is in reading comprehension, the more fluent they naturally are when reading. Some students need extra support and assistance with reading comprehension before they can become truly fluent. Taking the time to assess student comprehension and provide continual reading comprehension activities will also promote fluency.

Beginning Reader

Exams Study Tips : Boosts your Memory

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Your memory plays an important part in preparing for exams. The tips and ideas in this section will help you to remember things, but people learn things in different ways so try some of them and see which ones work best for you. For example, some students like to see information written down, some prefer to listen to information and others learn better while they are walking or moving around.

Try out these different ideas. Which ones help you remember best?

  • Use pictures and visuals to help you remember things. For example, to learn vocabulary, use a picture dictionary.
  • Make diagrams and mind maps. For example, make mind maps for different topics of vocabulary or use tables to record word families.

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  • Write notes and then use highlighters and coloured pens to focus on important things. For example, use different colours to highlight pronunciation or different grammatical words.
  • Look at your diagrams, mind maps or highlighted notes again a few hours later or the next day. The more often you look at your notes, the more you will remember.
  • Write things down.

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  • Stick pieces of paper around your room with notes and look at them regularly.
  • Use your mobile phone or an online voice recorder (there are lots of free voice recorders online) to record your voice. Record yourself reading your notes and then listen to the recordings.

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  • Study with a friend. Explain things to each other and ask each other some questions. If you like listening to information, this will help you remember.
  • Read out loud (or record) just the main points you have underlined or highlighted.

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  • Listen to your notes regularly. The more you listen, the more you will remember.
  • Connect new information to things you already know. For example, when you learn a new meaning of a word, think about the meaning you already know. Is there a connection?

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  • Read your notes aloud while you are sitting or walking  around.
  • Go for a walk with a friend and test each other while you are walking.

source: British Council